¡Adelante Hermanos! Building a Better Future for Latino Men and Boys Crowdfunding Contest

¡Adelante Hermanos! Building a Better Future for Latino Men and Boys Crowdfunding Contest

Posted by on Aug 10, 2015 in Contests, General

¡Adelante Hermanos! Building a Better Future for Latino Men and Boys Crowdfunding Contest

GritoBlast! HIPGive is excited to announce the #AdelanteHermanos: Building a Better Future for Latino Men and Boys crowdfunding contest in September 2015 and $15,000 total in matching funds to assist nonprofit organizations serving Latino communities across the U.S. and Latin America raise much needed funds for innovative projects that seek to empower Latino brothers. This includes a mix of direct service and policy level approaches to address immediate and long-term needs across the education, health, economic development and juvenile justice sectors.

If you have an innovative project targeting Latino men and/or boys, create your project now and join our community of champions for Latino causes on HIPGive! Raise funds for your project on our platform, while receiving valuable training on online fundraising, marketing and communications. Click HERE to review the basic eligibility criteria for HIPGive.

Dates: Tuesday, September 22, 2015 – Thursday, October 22, 2015 (4 Weeks)

Did You Know?

Today in the U.S., Latino males make up 22% of ALL males between the ages 10 and 24.

-Latino men and boys are largely missing from middle-class jobs. As of 2010, more than 70% of employed Latino men work in construction, logistic or services and earn on average between $27,976 and $22,724 annually, assuming they are able to secure year-round employment.In 2011, the estimated dropout rate for Latino boys in the U.S. was 14.6%, compared to 8.3% for African American boys and 5.4% for White boys.

-For Latino boys born outside the U.S., 35.8% dropped out of school in 2010.
As of 2012, Latino men were incarcerated at a rate nearly 40% higher than White men.

-Forty percent of young people in Latin America are significantly affected by poverty, and 15% live in extreme poverty.