The 2015 LatinasinBusiness.us Best Business Contest

The 2015 LatinasinBusiness.us Best Business Contest

Posted by on Sep 30, 2015 in Contests, General

The 2015 LatinasinBusiness.us Best Business Contest

GritoBlast!  Want to make $100 in 30 seconds? In celebration of their first anniversary coming up on 2015 Hispanic Heritage Month, LatinasinBusiness.us is launching a promotional opportunity*!

Deliver a 30-second elevator pitch video and participate in the 2015 LatinasinBusiness.us Best Business Award!

An elevator pitch is a brief, persuasive speech that can be used to spark interest in your business or organization, and the promotional tool that can land you a $100 gift card!

Pay attention to these dates:

  1. From September 15 to October 5: Go to LatinasinBusiness.us Facebook Fan Page , Like them and post your video with your 30-second elevator pitch telling them about your business, project, idea or product. Make it memorable, interesting and succinct! Explain to their readers what makes your “pitch” unique and win!
  2. From October 6 to October 12: Invite your friends to Like their Facebook Fan Page and vote for your video.
  3. On October 13: They will announce the 5 (five) finalists according to popular vote on their Facebook Fan Page.
  4. On October 15: 3 (three) winners in first, second and third place will be announced on their Facebook Fan Page.

The 2015 LatinasInBusiness.us Best Business Award (first place) will receive a $100 gift card. Second and third places will receive a $25 gift card. In addition, all 5 finalists will receive a FREE promotional feature article with your picture, the video you submitted, and a description of your products or services (a $1200 value) on LatinasinBusiness.us. All five feature articles will be promoted on their social media channels!

In addition, all entries will participate in an opportunity to win a FREE promotional feature article with your picture, video and a description of your products or services (a $1200 value) on LatinasinBusiness.us.

Promotion opens from September 15 to October 15. Video entries will be voted between October 6 and October 12th on LatinasinBusiness.us FB page. Five finalists will be announced on October 13th. Three awardees will be announced on October 15th in first, second and third place. Decision will be made by members of the Editorial Board of LatinasinBusiness.us.

*This promotional opportunity is only for Latinas or Hispanic female small business owners or entrepreneurs hiring 25 employees or less.

EVERYBODY WINS! All participants will qualify for an opportunity to receive a FREE promotional feature article on LIBizus with your picture, video and a description of your products or services.

Don’t miss this opportunity to promote your business for free (limited time offer!). For additional questions, please email Susana@latinasinbusiness.us.

 

Here some tips to create your elevator pitch

Adapted from Creating your Elevator Pitch By Keith Jackson and the Mind Tools Team

Key Points

An elevator pitch is a brief, persuasive speech that you can use to spark interest in what your organization does. You can also use one to create interest in a project, idea, or product – or in yourself. A good elevator pitch should last no longer than a short elevator ride of 20 to 30 seconds, hence the name.

It needs to be succinct but memorable, while conveying important information.

To craft a great pitch, follow these steps:

  1. Identify your goal.
  2. Explain what you do.
  3. Communicate your USP (unique selling proposition).
  4. Engage with a question.
  5. Put it all together.
  6. Practice.

Try to keep a business card or other take-away item with you, which helps the other person remember you and your message. And cut out any information that doesn’t absolutely need to be there.

It can take some time to get your pitch right. You’ll likely go through several versions before finding one that is compelling, and that sounds natural in a conversation.

Follow these steps to create a great pitch, but bear in mind that you’ll need to vary your approach depending on what your pitch is about.

  1. Identify Your Goal: Start by thinking about the objective of your pitch.

For instance, do you want to tell potential clients about your organization? Do you have a great new product idea that you want to pitch to an executive? Or do you want a simple and engaging speech to explain what you do for a living?

  1. Explain What You Do: Start your pitch by describing what your organization does. 

Focus on the problems that you solve and how you help people. If you can, add information or a statistic that shows the value in what you do.

Ask yourself this question as you start writing: what do you want your audience to remember most about you?

Keep in mind that your pitch should excite you first; after all, if you don’t get excited about what you’re saying, neither will your audience. Your pitch should bring a smile to your face and quicken your heartbeat. People may not remember everything that you say, but they will likely remember your enthusiasm.

Example: Imagine that you’re creating an elevator pitch that describes what your company does. You plan to use it at networking events. You could say, “My company writes mobile device applications for other businesses.” But that’s not very memorable!

A better explanation would be, “My company develops mobile applications that businesses use to train their staff remotely. This results in a big increase in efficiency for an organization’s managers.”

That’s much more interesting, and shows the value that you provide to these organizations.

  1. Communicate Your USP: Your elevator pitch also needs to communicate your unique selling proposition or USP.

Identify what makes you, your organization, or your idea, unique. You’ll want to communicate your USP after you’ve talked about what you do.

Example: To highlight what makes your company unique, you could say, “We use a novel approach because unlike most other developers, we visit each organization to find out exactly what people need. Although this takes a bit more time, it means that on average, 95 percent of our clients are happy with the first beta version of their app.”

  1. Engage with a Question: After you communicate your USP, you need to engage your audience. 

To do this, prepare open-ended questions (questions that can’t be answered with a “yes” or “no” answer) to involve them in the conversation.

Make sure that you’re able to answer any questions that he or she may have.

Example: You might ask “So, how does your organization handle the training of new people?”

woman with gift card

  1. Put it all Together: When you’ve completed each section of your pitch, put it all together.

Then, read it aloud and use a stopwatch to time how long it takes. It should be no longer than 20-30 seconds. Otherwise you risk losing the person’s interest, or monopolizing the conversation.

Then, try to cut out anything doesn’t absolutely need to be there. Remember, your pitch needs to be snappy and compelling, so the shorter it is, the better!

Example: Here’s how your pitch could come together:

“My company develops mobile applications that businesses use to train their staff remotely. This means that senior managers can spend time on other important tasks.

“Unlike other similar companies, we visit each organization to find out exactly what people need. This means that, on average, 95 percent of our clients are happy with the first version of their app.

“So, how does your organization handle the training of new people?”

  1. Practice: Like anything else, practice makes perfect. 

Remember, how you say it is just as important as what you say. If you don’t practice, it’s likely that you’ll talk too fast, sound unnatural, or forget important elements of your pitch.

Set a goal to practice your pitch regularly. The more you practice, the more natural your pitch will become. You want it to sound like a smooth conversation, not an aggressive sales pitch.

Make sure that you’re aware of your body language   as you talk, which conveys just as much information to the listener as your words do. Practice in front of a mirror or, better yet, in front of colleagues until the pitch feels natural.

As you get used to delivering your pitch, it’s fine to vary it a little – the idea is that it doesn’t sound too formulaic or like it’s pre-prepared, even though it is!